Read Robin, The Editors Interview

This round robin interview includes the following editors:

Eloisa Amezcua JPEG (1)

ELOISA AMEZCUA’s debut collection, From the Inside Quietly, is the inaugural winner of the Shelterbelt Poetry Prize selected by Ada Limón. She is the founder and editor of The Shallow Ends: A Journal of Poetry. [The Shallow Ends: A Journal of Poetry]

Marcus Clayton

MARCUS CLAYTON is a writer, musician, and college professor from South Gate, CA, whose works appeared in Los Angeles Review of Books, lipstickparty magazine, and Tahoma Literary Review, among others. [indicia]

Seth Copeland

SETH COPELAND’s poetry has appeared in Crab FatMenacing HedgeOtolithsSan Pedro River ReviewMud Season Review, and Snorkel. He is the founding editor of Jazz Cigarette, and publishing editor for New Plains Review. Seth teaches and studies at the University of Central Oklahoma. [Jazz Cigarette]

Rachel Sahaidachny

RACHEL SAHAIDACHNY is associate editor of The Indianapolis Review and works as programs manager for The Indiana Writers Center. Her writing has been published in Southeast ReviewRadar PoetryRed Paint Hill, and others. [The Indianapolis Review]

Natalie Solmer

NATALIE SOLMER is the founder and editor in chief of The Indianapolis Review. She teaches English at Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis and Ivy Tech Community College. Find links to her work at http://www.nataliesolmer.com.[The Indianapolis Review]

AJ Urquidi

AJ URQUIDI is a California-based writer/editor. His words appear in journals including Vector Press, Foothill, and Verdad, and received the Gerald Locklin Writing Prize. [indicia]

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S71 Contributor Interviews: Genelle Chaconas

Vertical selfieWhat is it about the genre or cross-genre you write in that interests you/draws you in?

I enjoy cross genre and experimental writing because I love writing materials that aren’t even literary. I’ve published lists, forms, etc. The detritus aspect of it appeals to me; I’m fascinated by reading we experience everyday, wads of junk mail we recycle, envelopes we shred, the endless copying and filing, etc.

How does this published piece fit in with the larger thematic concerns that you see in your overall work?

I was writing pieces with word limits: in this case, 50 words. You’d be amazed what you can do with 50 words or less when you forget about  grammatically correct or coherent sentences. This practice of controlled discord is central to my work. And I’m also into speculative genres.

What are you influenced by? 

I’m most influenced by paradigm shifting. I love doing anything (legal) which challenges my senses, tastes, abilities, etc. I relish anything which helps me question myself, experience new forms of thought process, practice chaotic or ‘chance’ forms such as cut-ups or fold-ins, whatever seeks to change or alter my consciousness.

What does your typical writing schedule look like? What aspects of working do you look forward to? What aspects frustrate you?

I try to write every day. When I don’t, I know. It’s like not sleeping. I often do not look forwards to writing, particularly when a larger project needs much editing. However, I enjoy creating new methods I can practice and experiment with, no matter how strange they may be.

For fun, if you could pick one meal that matches the piece we published, what would it be and why? 

Instant Buddha Feast. That’s not the name of it, but I remember seeing something like it at a supermarket. It described a luscious Tibetan ‘inspired’ vegan feast, pricey, chic, cruelty free, all organic, in a foil package. Add hot water and in three minutes, voila. There’s something frightening about that.

GENELLE CHACONAS is genderfluid, queer, feminist, an abuse survivor, and proud. They earned their BA in Creative writing from CSUS (2009) and their MFA in Writing and Poetics from Naropa University (2015). Their first chapbook is Fallout, Saints and Dirty Pictures (little m Press, 2011). Their work is published or forthcoming in The New Engagement, A3, Fjords, WomenArts Quarterly, Jet Fuel Review, Milkfist, Menacing Hedge, Image OutWrite, Crack the Spine, Third Wednesday, Bombay Gin, Calaveras Station, Late Peaches: Poems by Sacramento Poets and many others. They are a volunteer reader for Tule Review . They’re drafting their first ‘real book’. They’re starting a online literary publication of their own soon. They performed at Sacramento’s Art Street with Library of Musiclandria. They enjoy gangster flicks, cheap takeout, industrial/noise music, edm, drone, cut-up and fold in technique, William S. Burroughs, queer art, cyberpunk and biopunk, and long walks off short piers.

 

SR71 Contributor Interviews: Jordan Scott

unnamedWhat is it about the genre or cross-genre you write in that interests you/draws you in?

I came into fiction from a place of being a poet first and foremost, which has really informed the way I construct my short stories. There’s something pleasurable about accessing modes that feel more rooted in poetry—such as a sort of incantatory lyric—and braiding them through a story on a sentence level. The short story as a form also gives me ample space to layer different ideas into my writing.

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“Investigating the Nature of Reality”: An Interview with Brian Evenson

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Photo of Brian Evenson

Recently, Sonora Review‘s 2017-2018 Co-Editor-in-Chief, Patrick Cline, interviewed Brian Evenson, writer of numerous works of fiction and our 2017 Fiction Contest judge.

First off, thank you so much for judging our Spring fiction contest. We love your choice, Kate Berson’s “Luz, Milagro,” and are thrilled to publish it in Sonora Review #72. What do you admire about this story, and what led you to choose it out of the other submissions?

I found it a subtle story, and somewhat elusive–which I mean as a great compliment. It’s the kind of story that gave me just enough to move forward but also maintained a certain amount of mystery. It’s also not necessarily the kind of story I would naturally gravitate toward, and so it had to work a little harder to draw me in. I found it an exceptionally well written story: that, above all, was what convinced me to choose it.

As a semi-frequent contest judge, can you give us a sense of your process in this role, both in this case specifically and generally speaking? What do you look for in a story, and what do you pay attention to? Do you see any tendencies in your choices?

I try to go into each contest with an open mind. It’s more that I’m waiting for the story to convince me that it should be chosen than that I’m looking for something specific–which I guess means I’m looking for something well-written, original and convincing. But, honestly, the story that I chose for the last contest I judged and Berson’s story are radically different. The only thing they have in common is that the people writing them are thinking really actively about language and what it can do.

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Interview with Charlie Hanline

Natasha Stagg: How long have you been writing?

Charlie Hanline: Approximately ten years

NS: Do you write every day?

CH: No, but then I feel guilty

NS: What are your thoughts on writing?

CH: Writing lets you live vicariously those elements that you are unable to experience directly. Writing makes you be more in tune with people and your environment. You are more aware of what you say and do. You notice the details in life. Good writing never hurts another individual.

NS: Ever read the advice that authors give?

CH: Definitely, I have at least a hundred books of writing advice from authors.

NS: Do you have some advice to give?

CH: Never write anything that would embarrass your mama. Never try to hurt another through writing, or any other means. When you stare at a blank page, don’t pay too much attention to the blood draining from your ears, eye sockets, nose, and forehead. Write with passion.

NS: Who is your favorite author of the moment, and why should we read them?

CH: I’ve always enjoyed westerns by Elmer Kelton. He provides thoughtful keltonisms (words of wisdom to live by) throughout his books. I was sorry to hear of his passing last year. He was a great author and a true gentleman. I was also saddened by Tony Hillerman’s passing. He was a great author also. Carl Hiaasen – he’s funny, entertaining and interesting. One other author I’d like to mention is Dan O’Brien. He may not have saved the world, but he sure helped save the peregrine falcon and has helped to restore the grasslands of South Dakota.

NS: What is a book that kind of blew your mind, that we’d be surprised by?

CH: The War Prayer by Mark Twain